APPE Reflection: Advanced Community & Enhanced Clinical Services

As with any new rotation, I was very nervous going into this one. However, I had an amazing experience. I got to do things during my community rotation that I feel like a lot of people don’t get the chance to do.

What were those things? Lots of clinical services! I worked with several of our Chronic Care Management (CCM) patients and was able to call and check in on them and see how they were doing with their chronic conditions and how they were dealing with COVID. This is a task that I feel not many people relate to pharmacists, but we are in the perfect position to do these types of services! It’s important to check in on these patients and make sure that they do not have  any pressing issues with regards to their medications or their health in general. Pharmacists partner with physicians to provide these services to their patients. Another important clinical service that I was a part of was Medication Therapy Management (MTM). This involves calling patients and making sure their medication regimen is up to date, they are adherent to their medications, and they are not having any unwanted side effects. It’s important to make sure patients are taking the medications as they are prescribed to them. 

I also participated in 4 flu shot clinic days where I was able to give ~200 flu shots to teachers and other government employees. 

Aside from the clinics, I also gave flu shots, shingles shots, pneumonia shots, and tetanus/diphtheria shots in the pharmacy. 

I also did a lot of blister packaging. For those of you who may not know what that is, it’s where the pharmacy packs all of a patients medications in a weekly or monthly pack with the foil backing to so that the patient can see that they did or did not take their medications on a certain day. Not only did I pack them, I was able to check a few that my preceptor packed (to get experience actually acting as the pharmacist) and looked through patient charts to make sure that their medication regimen made sense. I was able to find some areas where the packs could be improved and was able to prevent some medication errors.

I was able to also check a few prescriptions (with my preceptor) to make sure I understand what it’s like to actually be the pharmacist.

Here’s a couple pie charts that show some of the things that I was able to do over this rotation!

August Patient Care Tasks
September Patient Care Tasks

I really, really enjoyed my time at this rotation site, and I’m so excited for my Ambulatory Care rotation next month! 

Stay Golden,

Emily

APPE Reflection: Critical Care

I was very intimidated going into this rotation because it is only my 2nd APPE experience and the CCU is such a fast-paced environment. However, I have learned a lot over this rotation, and I had the best experience I could have imagined. My confidence in making recommendations to providers has increased significantly, and I was able to do a lot of independent learning.

During the first week, I had my first counseling experience of the month. I was able to counsel a patient on a new prescription for warfarin. It was a great experience because there are so many different things to consider when counseling on warfarin (diet, bleed risk, goal INR, etc).

I also had my first ED shift of the month this week and was able to complete several medication histories as well as make calls to pharmacies to gather information/cancel prescriptions that were sent to them by mistake. It is the job of the ED pharmacist to make calls for patients who tested negative for COVID and make sure that they no longer had a fever. I was able to practice with this on week 1.

I witnessed my first rapid sequence intubation during week 1 and was able to assist the pharmacist in drawing up medications to make sure it ran as smoothly as possible.

Week 1 was also where I began rounding every day on the CCU. Every day, I spent half of my shift sitting on the unit by myself and assisting with any medication related questions that the nurses/providers may have. Of course, being a student, I had to report to my preceptor with all of the recommendations that I had to make sure they were appropriate before recommending them to the provider.

Moving on to week 2, I was able to dose a new start vancomycin in a patient and adjust a heparin drip based on the patient’s aPTT level.

Week 2 was also where I had my weekend ED shifts. I completed 7 medication histories, 16 negative COVID callbacks, and another intubation.

The rest of the month was pretty chaotic. I attended 4 rapid responses, 2 codes, rounded on a total of 35 patients, dosed and prepared TPA, and made daily recommendations to providers. I pretty much handled the CCU patients on my own, with verification with my preceptor.

My big projects for the month were to present a case presentation on a COVID patient that had been in the CCU for most of my month long rotation and create a reference sheet on how to treat hypertensive crises.

I also had 1-2 topic discussions a week on critical care topics such as FASTHUGS, Sepsis, the ABCDEF bundle, RSI/NMBA, PADIS, and ACLS.

The hardest part of this rotation was experiencing codes and seeing how intense and emotionally draining they can be.

I have nothing but good experiences to report for this rotation, and I’m so sad to be leaving this hospital until January. I have really connected with the pharmacy staff here and really have started to feel like family. I hope to have as good of an experience during my Ambulatory Care and Community rotations that I have over the next few months.

I will continue to keep you all updated with all of my rotations!

Stay golden,

Emily

APPE Reflection: Advanced Hospital

First things first, I’d like to mention that I am extremely blessed to be granted permission to continue onto my APPE rotations even in the midst of COVID-19.

This was my first APPE rotation, and I can honestly say that I had an amazing experience. It was better than I could ever have expected. I was not only able to see how to complete orders in the pharmacy, I was able to complete a lot of clinical coursework and attend a lot of meetings.

Throughout my first week, I worked on improving my ability to work through the pharmacy system and find important information in the patient chart. I wrote several brief SOAP notes on the patients that I worked up. On Friday of the first week, I did a lot of research on remdesivir and its dosing because we had a COVID positive patient that we were going to start on remdesivir, and it was our first time gaining access to the drug. I helped one of our pharmacy residents put together a protocol on how we were going to administer it and store it, and even helped prepare a folder full of information on the drug to keep in the pharmacy for the pharmacy staff to refer to.

Then, on my second week, I worked in the main pharmacy for 3 of the days. I was able to assist the pharmacist in checking orders in patient charts, checking IV preparations, and checking cart fill to make sure everything was appropriate and given for the right patient. I really learned a lot during this time. Thursday and Friday I spent most of my time working up patient charts. I did some vancomycin kinetic dosing based on trough levels, warfarin dosing based on INR levels, and increasing/decreasing insulin regimens based on patient 24 hour BG levels. One of my biggest passions so far in pharmacy is diabetes management and education, so it was really exciting to actually be able to make recommendations on insulin regimens. I was actually able to document my intervention notes and discuss recommendations with providers.

On week 3, I was able to spend some time shadowing the pharmacy technicians. I really enjoyed this week because it is important to know exactly what the technicians are responsible for in the pharmacy, and the technicians at the hospital that I am doing rotations at are all really sweet and welcoming. I was also able to help compound oral liquids and a few IVs. On Friday, I spent my day in the Emergency Department. Our hospital is fortunate enough to have an ED pharmacist. I was able to help give recommendations to the physicians and research things that I was unsure of. I learned a lot down in the ED and was able to shadow some medication history reviews.

Week 4 involved more clinical work and a presentation. Monday was spent in the ED again doing similar things. I spent Tuesday up on the surgery floor working through new-start TPN dosing and making sure the post-surgery patients had all of their post-surgery medications on their profile. Wednesday-Thursday, I worked on the medical floor and learned a lot about my patients (because I was able to follow them for 2 days). I learned a lot about alcoholic cirrhosis and meningitis. I also gave a presentation on Malignant Hyperthermia on Wednesday afternoon to the pharmacy staff. Friday was my day off to attend my cousin Ben’s wedding.

Throughout the course of the month, I was also able to attend a lot of meetings with my preceptor and other pharmacists. This was very beneficial for me because I was able to see all of the responsibilities that pharmacists may have and the roles they play on a multidisciplinary team. I attended a meeting on the hospital’s metrics, a P&T committee meeting, and an antimicrobial stewardship meeting.

I can honestly say that I learned a lot from this rotation. I learned more than I ever thought would be possible in just 1 month.

I can’t believe I only have 8 more rotations to go! I’m super excited to begin my next APPE rotation, which is an inpatient elective in Critical Care. I’ll make sure to keep track of everything that I do so that I can keep y’all updated!

Until then…

Stay Golden,

Emily